Webinar Archive

This page has archived webinars from the HealthMeet® project and other sources.

Table of Contents

AGING

APHA DISABILITY SECTION WEBINARS

AUTISM

COMMUNITY SUPPORTS/RESOURCES

FIRST AID/EMERGENCY CARE

DIABETES

FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDERS (FASD)

FRAGILE X

GENERAL HEALTH TOPICS

HEALTH CARE

HEALTHMEET PROJECT OVERVIEW AND RESOURCES

NUTRITION

OBESITY/EXERCISE

ORAL HEALTH

TOBACCO

WOMEN'S HEALTH


Archived Webinars

AGING:

Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Dementia; Assessment and Healthcare Practices - $10 - Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities are aging and living longer than ever. Decline in their daily function with the possibility of developing dementia increases with age, especially in adults with Down syndrome.  Seth Keller, MD Immediate Past President of the AADMD and Co-Chair of the National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices reviews how changes in function can be assessed so that an accurate and early diagnosis of dementia can be determined. Healthcare advocacy and practices are all essential in ensuring that appropriate therapies and planning for eventual decline and associated complications are anticipated and cared for. The guidelines of the National Task Group is also be reviewed.

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Health Care for Adults Aging with IDD - The Canadian research project Examining the Organization of Healthcare for Aging Adults with Intellectual Disabilities, funded by the Vancouver Foundation, examines the implementation of healthcare policies into practice for adults aging with intellectual disabilities. In B.C., deinstitutionalization of persons with ID occurred decades ago and people aging with intellectual disabilities have lived in various community settings for years. Health Services for Community Living (HSCL) is a unique B.C. provincial program established following the closure of large institutions to specifically address the healthcare needs of people with ID living in the community. This project aimed to better understand the consequences of policies for those who experience them and begin to address health disparities experienced by adults aging with ID in British Columbia (BC), Canada. The study examined policy-practice gaps in the implementation of HSCL and other relevant services and policies across five regional health authorities. The team established and received input on study procedures from a community advisory committee. Data and demographic information was collected through policy analyses and interviews or focus groups held with various different groups of people.

Findings focus on several key areas:

  1. The practical policy implications of transitioning from “Person with Disabilities” to “Senior Citizen” status.
  2. The lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals to provide appropriate care for this population.
  3. The availability of informal supports for aging parents and siblings.
  4. End of life care.

The speaker, Jennifer Baumbush from the University of British Columbia, will go over the Implications from this study which include a need to integrate content into healthcare professional programs and continuing education, as well as specific policy changes required to support adults with intellectual disabilities as they experience increasing age and frailty.

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Grief, Loss and Hospice Care for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities - This webinar offers an overview of hospice care, grief, grief support and how it can help individuals with intellectual disabilities cope during these difficult times.  Throughout the presentation Amy Tucci and Kenneth Doka from the Hospice Foundation of America will touch upon the special issues involving access and services for individuals with ID and focus on the ways that families and persons with ID can more effectively utilize the services of hospice care, such as supportive counseling, pain management, and symptom control as well as grief counseling. Learn about their new CE credited educational program that deals with the challenges of accessing end-of-life care and bereavement support for individuals with ID.

Dementia in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities - $10 - Dr. Ronald Lucchino, Ph.D. President of the Board for the Southwest Florida Area Agency on Aging, gives a comprehensive overview of dementia. In this webinar he describes behaviors and symptoms of dementia, the different types and risk factors to miss-diagnosing an adult with an intellectual disability with dementia. Examples will be given to show the difference between Alzheimer’s and dementia in adults with IDD as opposed to the general population.

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Understanding Behavioral Changes in Adults with I/DD and Dementia - $10 - This webinar dives into the behavioral aspects of dementia in persons with IDD. Dr. Kathie Bishop and Ms. Kathleen Pears will team up and go into detail regarding symptoms and behaviors associated with dementia in this population, and how sensory challenges can often be misinterpreted and associated with dementia. Environmental factors that can contribute to certain behaviors are introduced as well as changes that you can make in an individual’s environment that will help to reduce specific attributes as well.

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APHA DISABILITY SECTION WEBINARS:

Social Determinants and Health Promotion for Persons with Disabilities - This webinar focuses on Social Determinants and Health Promotion for Persons with Disabilities. The moderator is Adriane Griffen, MPH, MCHES. Ms. Griffen serves as the CDC Cooperative Agreement Project Director at the Association of University Centers on Disabilities. Her activities focus on building the nation's capacity on public health activities for birth defects, developmental disabilities, and health promotion for people living with disabilities. There is a team of presenters from the APHA Disability Section that will include the following topics:

  • E Zhang, M.Ed is a doctoral student in Applied Behavioral Science at University of Kansas. Her presentation focuses on the training for improving self-advocacy skills of college students with disabilities to request ADA accommodation. The presentation is entitled "Teaching how to request ADA accommodation--A self advocacy training for college students with disabilities".
  • Eliza Fernie, MPH is a recent graduate of Boston University's School of Public Health. Her presentation centers around a series of assignments from her graduate studies in which she designed a community-based public health intervention to increase physical activity among adults with chronic conditions and disabilities. Her final challenge in those assignments was to fit her "choose anything you're passionate about" intervention into a real-life Request for Proposal aimed at eliminating health disparities in Massachusetts.
  • Lieke van Heumen, MSc has a masters degree in Psychology with a concentration in gerontology at Radboud University in Nijmegen, Netherlands and is currently a doctoral candidate in Disability Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her dissertation and presentation focus on the health and social relations of people aging with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She uses qualitative methods (i.e., interviews, life story work, and social network mapping techniques) to examine these relations.

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Quality of Life & Health Promotion for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities - The Arc hosts a special webinar featuring a team from APHA’s Disability Section Executive Council with Gloria Krahn, the Director of the Division of Human Development and Disability at NCBDDD as the moderator. Each of the 3 speaker’s presentation focuses on a different topic relating to improving the quality of life for individuals living with an intellectual disability.

  • Developing and Evaluating Family-level Outcome Measures for Use in Health and Disability Research Stephen Firsing, PhD, is a faculty member in the College of Health Sciences at the University of Kentucky. His portion of the presentation focuses on the development of a new instrument to assess Family Quality of Life (FQOL) among caregivers of adults with traumatic brain injury using a mixed methods approach.
  • Resource Capacity and Health Interventions: Implementing and Evaluating the WBH Curriculum in Montana Holly Horan, MS is currently a doctoral student in Applied Medical Anthropology at Oregon State University. Her presentation focuses on the implementation and evaluation of the North Carolina Office on Disability and Health’s (NCODH) Women Be Healthy (WBH) curriculum in the rural state of Montana. This program was designed to encourage women with ID to become more active participants in their own health care, using three tactics: health education, anxiety reduction practices, and assertiveness and empowerment training.
  • End-of-Life Support Provided by Agency Staff for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Teresa Moro, AM is currently finishing her doctorate at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Her presentation discusses family member and agency staff experiences and the care received by adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities at the end of life. She also discusses facilitators and barriers identified by family members and agency staff.

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Barriers to Health Promotion for Persons with Disabilities - The Arc’s HealthMeet Initiative presents an informative webinar on three of these barriers from top Ph.D. students from APHA’s Disability Section Executive Council. Caroyn Lullo of the University of Illinois at Chicago, Helen Russette of the University of Montana and David Dawley of the University of Arizona bring their expertise to the table – and to you – for “Barriers to Health Promotion for Persons with Disabilities”. This unique session is aimed at putting research to work to solve problems for people with intellectual disabilities.

In this webinar you will learn more about:

  • Communication barriers and their impact on receiving proper care in rural areas of America along with innovative solutions to help reduce these barriers.
  • Internet-Based Physical Activity Programs and the recent findings from mixed method studies that explore what influences participation from individuals with intellectual disabilities (I/D) and how to successfully design an effective internet-based program to include those with I/D) which produce results.
  • Research findings on the Safe and Accessible Routes to School project and next steps on how to include students with disabilities. Find out what data supports the need for more accessibility and usability of identified routes in communities.

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Disability and Sexuality - This webinar will focus on sexuality and intellectual disability. It will identify determinants of teaching sex education, and the implications for developing and delivering sex education to adults with ID. Access to health care and health outcomes for the LGBT populations will be discussed, as well as disability issues and findings on disability among older adults in same-sex relationships.

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Environmental Factors for Individuals with Disabilities - A team of 3 presenters from the APHA Disability Section will be conducting a webinar regarding environmental factors for persons with disabilities.

  • Michaela Schenkelberg, MPH, presentation focuses on her research on physical activity promotion in preschoolers, and identifying the influences on physical activity of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.
  • Mara Nery-Hurwit, MS, primarily concentrations on physical activity and health behavior interventions for adults with disabilities.
  • Natasha Spassiani, details an exploratory case study examining the factors associated with sustaining community-based health initiatives for people with IDD living in group homes. This includes health and community participation for people with I/DD and participatory action research because it ensures that people with I/DD are actively involved in the research process.

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Healthcare Related Issues for Individuals with Disabilities - The first speaker, Lisa Voltolina, focuses on examining the experiences of parents of children with Autism in obtaining a medical diagnosis as many parents report a negative experience consisting of inconsistent information and many barriers with professionals and communication issues. The second half of the webinar features Victoria Stoneman and Sarah Long and their research regarding specific standards of care for adults with ID and the relation to hospital-acquired infections to reduce the numbers of infections and improve overall care.

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AUTISM:

Early Access to Care: Reduce the Average Age at Autism Diagnosis and Increase Access to Evidence-Based Early Intervention Services Lauren Elder, PhD, is the Assistant Director of Dissemination Science at Autism Speaks.  She discusses Autism Speaks’ Early Access to Care initiative, which seeks to reduce the average age of diagnosis and increase access to high-quality early intervention for all children on the autism spectrum. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders can be diagnosed as early as two years of age, however the average age of diagnosis for autism in the United States remains stubbornly close to 5 years old and is even higher in some ethnic minority communities. Many families lack access to effective early intervention therapies regardless of early diagnosis. Listen in to learn more about what Autism Speaks is doing to improve access to care and ways your efforts combined with those of others in your community can help make a difference.

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Improving Outcomes and Quality of Life for Adults with Autism - There are many quality indicators that can impact the lives of adults on the autism spectrum. Recent studies have outlined the lack of appropriate outcomes for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) once they leave their educational entitlement and enter adult services, particularly several years out. This webinar reviews the literature on current outcomes for adults with ASD and what the factors are that contribute to good quality of life. Our speakers, Leslie Long and Dave Kearon, review several domains that help impact individuals overall daily lifestyles including employment, housing and residential support, post-secondary education and community life.

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COMMUNITY SUPPORTS/RESOURCES:

UIC’s HealthMatters™ Curricula - The HealthMatters™ Program from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) offers various health-related trainings and curricula to help self-advocates, caregivers, families, and health care providers promote health, prevent disease, and foster community engagement of people with disabilities. Different programs are tailored for various audiences including people with disabilities, caregivers, families, and health care providers. Beth Marks, RN, PhD and Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH from the Department of Disability and Human Development at UIC share information regarding the various trainings that are associated with the HealthMatters™ Program. One of the trainings will be utilized by The Arc’s five HealthMeet® pilot sites to develop and implement a health promotion program in their communities.

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Integration of Individuals with Disabilities into Local Public Health Programs - Sarah Yates and Jennifer Li speak about NACCHO’s programs designed to help promote the integration of individuals with disabilities into local public health programs and activities.  These programs include a learning community with two modules – one focusing on obesity prevention and physical activity promotion, while the other encompasses emergency planning and preparedness for individuals with disabilities. They share lessons learned from health departments that have implemented these health programs in their own communities and demonstrate how they can be utilized within your own organization/family/etc.  NACCHO’s toolbox, which has over 80 tools pertaining to health and disability, is also showcased as a great online resource for free training materials, reports, fact sheets, and more.

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Practice Without Pressure - Practice Without Pressure (PWP) is an organization built to help individuals with intellectual disabilities learn step-by-step the procedures and common instruments used during routine doctor/dentist visits to help reduce stress and anxiety and make receiving healthcare easier for everyone involved. The founder and CEO, Deborah Jastrebski, is a mother of a child with Down Syndrome who underwent so many procedures/surgeries that going to the doctor became a terrifying experience for both of them. Many appointments resulted in her son having to be sedated or restrained to a papoose board just to get through it. Deb created PWP as an alternative to help her family and others in similar situations work through the angst of regular check-ups. PWP is a Delaware non-profit that empowers individuals with the confidence and tools necessary to overcome their fears and receive the medical, dental and personal care they need within a non-threatening environment. Please join in to hear Deb tell more about this one of a kind organization and the concepts and techniques involved that make it so successful.

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Using Smart Technology and the Cloud to Make Telehealth Accessible for People with I/DD - Due to some technical difficulties this presentation was not recorded. A copy of the PowerPoint presentation used during the webinar is attached to the above link.

People with cognitive limitations are six times more likely to have type 2 diabetes than the general population, as well as other chronic health problems. This is one example of an eminently preventable secondary health problem that has the potential to shift dramatically if supports for various lifestyle changes and more effective preventive health care are available. Smart technology is changing the way we live our daily lives. David O'Hara, Ph.D., Chief Operating Officer for the Westchester Institute for Human Development describes specific pilot projects that use smart technologies and cloud-based applications to support more effective preventive health care for people with I/DD using a range of telehealth strategies. The new accessibility features of tablet touch screen technologies and smart phones provide tools for the design of interactive applications that can support the delivery of better preventive health care and chronic disease management. In particular they provide access to easily available cloud-based patient education materials and patient care experience surveys. Standard patient satisfaction surveys (such as the CAHPS medical home survey from AHRQ) will be made accessible for people with I/DD, which will also use cloud technology to capture and analyze data to help improve the system. They can also promote more frequent contact between the patient and their health care providers as well as allow the health care team to prompt and coach individuals in following good preventive health care behavior.

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Building Inclusive Healthy Communities through the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) - A truly facilitating community is one in which health promotion activities (i.e., physical activity and nutrition) are as accessible to people with disabilities as they are to people without disabilities. Unfortunately, many people with disabilities or caregivers who have a child or family member with a disability have limited access to physical activity and healthy eating because of the substantially greater number of barriers they experience compared to people without disabilities in accessing programs, services and support systems. A well-planned “livable” community makes the right choice, the easy choice and includes people with disabilities. Environmental barriers are discussed and options to increase access to health promoting behaviors in the community are also provided. Resources from the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability are described and information on the Inclusive Fitness Coalition are shared.

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The State of Health and Wellness for Individuals with IDD - Historically, people with IDD have experienced health disparities related to many different factors including: lack of access to care, inadequate health care providers, and social determinants to name just a few. Recently though, a greater effort has been made to identify and address such disparities through programs that help encourage healthier lifestyles and educate health professionals. In this webinar, Lynda Lahti Anderson from the University of Minnesota’s Institute on Community Integration identifies the implications that will hinder future research on this these disparities and ways to improve methods of addressing health care needs for this population in efficient thorough specialized programs and cost-effective methods.

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FIRST AID/EMERGENCY CARE:

DDCARES: Preventing and Improving Emergency Care for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities - This presentation will explore what happens when individuals with developmental disabilities are in crisis and have to visit their hospital emergency department. What leads to these visits, how can they be prevented, and what can we do to be better prepared when they happen? Our speaker, Yona Lunsky, and Ontario's health care access research in developmental disabilities program have been studying these issues and working closely with hospitals, families, and policy makers to develop solutions.

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Mental Health First Aid for Consumers, Families and Staff - Dr. Lucy Esralew is the Clinical Administrator of SCCAT and S-COPE, two statewide crisis response and clinical follow-up programs funded by the NJ Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services through Trinitas Regional Medical Center. She gives an overview of an approach that is used to provide post-disaster support to individuals who have been exposed to manmade or natural disasters. This presentation reviews how we can extend support in times of crisis to consumers, families and staff in order to return everyone exposed to trauma to a sense of safety, routine and normalcy as soon as possible. Lucy discusses why individuals with IDD are particularly vulnerable following exposure to traumatic events and guidelines are offered to adapt this approach to the unique needs of individuals with IDD, their families and staff.

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DIABETES:

Prevent, Understand, and Live with Diabetes - $10 - Nurse Practitioner, Leone Murphy, from The Arc of New Jersey, presents information on one of The Arc of New Jersey's health promotion projects, Prevent, Understand, and Live with Diabetes. Leone has presented seminars on this topic for self advocates, staff and caregivers. She has helped to develop a Diabetes workbook and DVD -- written for self-advocates and caregivers -- that addresses the areas of prevention, diagnosis, symptoms, diet and treatment for individuals who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. These materials were developed with funding from the Horizon Foundation for New Jersey.

To receive a free copy of the diabetes booklet and a DVD (in English and Spanish) from The Arc of NJ, please contact Helen Rivera at: hrivera@arcnj.org or 732-246-2525, ext. 35.

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FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDERS (FASD):

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: What You Need to Know - $10 - The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) is a charity non-profit organization in their twenty-fourth year of operations. NOFAS is the leading voice on issues of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) and is committed to both prevention of FASD and creating a society that supports individuals living with the disorders. The presenter, Kathleen Mitchell, has been with NOFAS since the inception of the organization, and is a parent of an adult daughter with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). She provides an overview about FASD through the lifespan and addresses both FASD prevention and treatment. Ms. Mitchell reviews NOFAS prevention campaigns, including the clearinghouse, school and youth FASD prevention programs and birth mother initiatives. She describes four interventions for individuals with FASD currently being researched (with CDC support). She also reviews resources and support for individuals and their families and investigate ways in which Arc Chapters, the NOFAS Affiliate Network, the Friends of NOFAS and FASD family support groups can network and partner to create local systems of care for individuals with FASD.

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Creating Resiliency in Families Living with FASD: Moving from Grief to Empowerment - $10 - Families that are raising children with effects from prenatal alcohol exposure, known as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) oftentimes find themselves having to become experts on the topic. They often have to educate their healthcare providers, educators, counselors and others that provide treatment and support for their loved ones. It is easy for these families to burn out, and fall into a feeling of helplessness or despair. Kathy Mitchell, Vice President and National Spokesperson for the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) reviews some of the behavioral characteristics of individuals with FASD through the lifespan and discusses how families are also affected through the lifespan. She reviews the stages of denial and grief often experienced by family members and will focus on the importance of self-care for parents and caretakers. She also provides suggestions on how to deal with stress and develop a positive mindset that can allow families to move from grief and frustration to a place of acceptance. Current resources and supports are provided that are available for individuals and family members with FASD.

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FRAGILE X:

Fragile X Associated Disorders: More than a Syndrome - $10 - This webinar discusses the spectrum of disorders associated with the FMR1 gene mutation: Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), Fragile X Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (FXPOI), and Fragile X Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS). FXS is the leading known cause of autism and the most prevalent inheritable cause of intellectual disabilities. FXPOI affects 15-20% of women who have the premutation allele of the FMR1 gene and involves clinical features including irregular menses, reduced fertility and premature menopause. Also within the premutation range, the neurodegenerative condition known as FXTAS can occur in 46% of males and 17% of women. This webinar will provide a basic understanding of the FMR1 gene mutation, prevalence and clinical features of FX Associated Disorders. A discussion of the varied clinical presentations, associated health conditions and the most recent research on treatments is also included.

Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to...

  1. Identify the three known disorders associated with Fragile X
  2. Discuss the inheritance pattern and family involvement associated with Fragile X
  3. Recognize the varied clinical presentations of the full mutation, premutation and intermediate allele of the FMR1 gene
  4. Recognize management options
  5. Discuss recent research regarding drug development and genetics
  6. Identify national resources

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GENERAL HEALTH TOPICS:

Approaches to Training Healthcare Providers on Working with Patients with Disabilities - This webinar was co-sponsored by AUCD's Health and Disability Special Interest Group (SIG) and the Alliance for Disability in Health Care Education. Presenters in this webinar share their approaches to "making the case" for, designing, and implementing training for healthcare providers on working with patients with disabilities.

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Arc San Fran Health Advocacy Program - Jennifer Dresen and Wendy Ginther, Co-Directors at the Center for Health & Wellness at The Arc San Francisco discuss their Health Advocacy program and techniques used to help improve the overall health and wellness of many of their clients. Learn more about health needs of aging persons with ID and the unique challenges they face to maintain their health. Jennifer and Wendy are also joined by a team of Self Advocates who express their thoughts regarding health issues that have affected them and what has helped to make those experiences more comfortable. They inform us of the challenges and complications that obstruct them from maintaining a healthier lifestyle. Help learn more about how to help break down the barriers that stand in the way of having all individuals with disabilities receive better health care and become better advocates for healthier living.

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Seizures: Refractory Seizure Evaluation and Treatment in Adults with I/DD - Adults with I/DD often have complex and fragile medical difficulties including seizure disorders. Commonly, seizures are refractory to medication therapy and usage of multiple seizure medications, toxicities, ER visits and associated injuries may occur. The presentation reviews these various challenges as well as the difficulties that also contribute to problems with diagnosis, testing, and therapies. Recommendations are made to help ensure that better outcomes are achieved as well as improvements in quality of life.

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Improving Seizure Outcomes Through Online Seizure Diaries - SeizureTracker.com is an innovative website dedicated to help individuals that have frequent seizures and epilepsy understand the relationship between their seizures, medications/dosages and daily variables to help reduce seizure activity and understand the triggers. Rob Moss, the Co-Founder of SeizureTracker.com, will share some of the tools and personalized reports the system can generate to help empower patients about their medical needs. These reports can then be shared with your doctors to help them better understand and search for answers to your specific situation to improve daily living.

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Frankly Speaking About Cancer Radio Broadcast - Living with cancer can be a challenge for anyone—but what if you also have an intellectual or developmental disability? On this episode of Frankly Speaking About Cancer, we explore the unique challenges people with intellectual or developmental disabilities, their caregivers and their health care teams face when it comes to cancer prevention, screening and treatment. Show host Linda House, RN, of the Cancer Support Community, is joined by Robyn J. Blanchard, RN, of The Arc Gloucester; Leone Murphy, MSN, RN, of The Arc of New Jersey; and Karen Luken, MSRA, of the North Carolina Office on Disability and Health.

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The Most Common Medical Problems in Specialized Care for People with I/DD - Persons with I/DD often have the same medical problems as others, but may present in a different fashion. It is after much experience that one may be able to develop insights into these presentations. Dr. Ted Feigelman discusses some of the common medical issues in this population, and some of the special approaches to address these needs.

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When in Doubt, Rule It Out: Medical Problems and Aggressive Behaviors of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) - People with ID and ASD have high rates of health problems, and these are often missed or under-treated. Frequently, individuals with these disabilities have difficulty communicating their own symptoms, and the only signs of a medical issue or medication side effect are irritable moods and challenging behaviors. In many cases, psychoactive medications are prescribed to reduce aggression, when a treatable medical problem is the real cause of the clinical problem. The most common medical problems and side effects found in patients with ID and ASD are presented with tips on how to increase detection. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach to evaluation of aggression and other problem behaviors in people with ID and ASD is emphasized.

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HEALTH CARE:

Health Care for Adults Aging with IDD - The Canadian research project Examining the Organization of Healthcare for Aging Adults with Intellectual Disabilities, funded by the Vancouver Foundation, examines the implementation of healthcare policies into practice for adults aging with intellectual disabilities. In B.C., deinstitutionalization of persons with ID occurred decades ago and people aging with intellectual disabilities have lived in various community settings for years. Health Services for Community Living (HSCL) is a unique B.C. provincial program established following the closure of large institutions to specifically address the healthcare needs of people with ID living in the community. This project aimed to better understand the consequences of policies for those who experience them and begin to address health disparities experienced by adults aging with ID in British Columbia (BC), Canada. The study examined policy-practice gaps in the implementation of HSCL and other relevant services and policies across five regional health authorities. The team established and received input on study procedures from a community advisory committee. Data and demographic information was collected through policy analyses and interviews or focus groups held with various different groups of people.

Findings focus on several key areas:

  1. The practical policy implications of transitioning from “Person with Disabilities” to “Senior Citizen” status.
  2. The lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals to provide appropriate care for this population.
  3. The availability of informal supports for aging parents and siblings.
  4. End of life care.

The speaker, Jennifer Baumbush from the University of British Columbia, will go over the Implications from this study which include a need to integrate content into healthcare professional programs and continuing education, as well as specific policy changes required to support adults with intellectual disabilities as they experience increasing age and frailty.

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The President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities Report and Recommendations for Managed Long-Term Services and Supports - $10 - Across the country, states are transforming the way they finance and deliver Medicaid long-term services and supports for individuals with disabilities. Many states are considering Managed Long-Term Services and Supports (MLTSS) programs as a way to improve coordination, promote systems change, and achieve savings. There are potential benefits, but also significant concerns for individuals with ID/DD. Stakeholder engagement from individuals with disabilities and their families and strong federal oversight are critical as states consider developing and implementing programs. The President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (PCPID) convened experts on MLTSS and issued a report with numerous specific recommendations. This webinar provides an overview of MLTSS, explains key issues for individuals with ID/DD, and highlights recommendations contained in the report.
Speakers: Joe Caldwell, Deborah Spitalnik and Elizabeth Weintraub.

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Identifying and Improving Barriers to Healthcare for Individuals with IDD - Meg Traci, Ph.D., the Project Director of The Montana Disability and Health Program at The University of Montana Rural Institute, discusses the current barriers to receiving adequate healthcare. Dr. Traci introduces specific issues and techniques to help resolve those barriers to help increase the number of individuals with IDD who receive healthcare regularly. These techniques include ways to make facilities more accessible and health forms that are more user-friendly to individuals with IDD. She spotlights resources and tools that can be helpful in reviewing current facilities, documents, and programs to ensure they are effective for everyone.

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Improving Health through Training Future Health Care Professionals (Previous title: Inclusive Health Promotion Strategies) – In this webinar, attendees will hear from LENDs and UCEDDs about strategies for training future health professionals to build knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to provide quality health-related services for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. After briefly describing key issues in health for adults with I/DD and barriers to effective health care caused by insufficient training of health providers, the presenters (Susan Havercamp, PhD, Leslie Cohen, JD and Karen Edwards, MD MPH) will share strategies and resources for incorporating curriculum on adult health issues into training of future health professionals

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Medical Diagnostics and Health Care Justice - Join us for a discussion on medical diagnostics and healthcare justice, with leaders from the US Access Board and the Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund. Attendees will learn updates on the current medical diagnostics rule as well as how to educate others in their communities about health care provider misconceptions and stereotypes.

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HEALTHMEET PROJECT OVERVIEW AND RESOURCES:

Introduction to HealthMeet®: An introduction to HealthMeet® and its goals.

Introduction to The Therap System - Overview of how to use the Therap system  to input data for Health Assessment sites. 

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NUTRITION:

What's For Dinner? Planning for Success in Healthy Eating - $10 - In this webinar you will learn ways to set everyone up for success in maintaining a healthy diet in a person-centered way. Healthy eating and informed choices start with the people we support.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this webinar participants will be able to

  1. Demonstrate the "Choose Three" method of balancing a meal.
  2. Create a planning system for meals.
  3. Infuse person-centered practices into the menu planning process.

Putting Nutrition on Your Radar - $10 - It is very easy to get caught up in modern day diet fads, juice cleanses, etc. and not know what or who to believe anymore. Judith Dodd, MS, RD, LDN is a registered dietician and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Clinical Dietetics and Nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh. She provides an update on current nutrition/diet guidelines to help put nutrition back on your radar. Judith takes an in-depth look at the facts versus fallacies to divulge what’s true and expose what’s not. Choosing the healthier option in the grocery store can often times be difficult and mislead too - Judith also provides us with tips on food selection and guidelines to help make grocery shopping healthier and easier. Resources to healthy eating and nutrition for the future are also supplied. Learn the facts of how to have a healthy diet without all the hassle!

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OBESITY/EXERCISE:

Weight Loss for Individuals with Disabilities - $10 - Expert guest speakers Richard and Muriel Saunders from the University of Kansas speak on effective weight loss plans in overweight adults with disabilities. This webinar will go into detail about methods, results and lessons learned in creating an effective weight loss program. These research-based programs have been proven to have great success in helping people with disabilities to keep the weight off and decrease obesity-prone health disparities. Richard and Muriel discuss barriers to eating healthy and strategies to increase consciousness of making healthier long-term eating decisions and how to track that progress.

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UIC’s HealthMatters™ Curricula - The HealthMatters™ Program from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) offers various health-related trainings and curricula to help self-advocates, caregivers, families, and health care providers promote health, prevent disease, and foster community engagement of people with disabilities. Different programs are tailored for various audiences including people with disabilities, caregivers, families, and health care providers. Beth Marks, RN, PhD and Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH from the Department of Disability and Human Development at UIC share information regarding the various trainings that are associated with the HealthMatters™ Program. One of the trainings will be utilized by The Arc’s five HealthMeet® pilot sites to develop and implement a health promotion program in their communities.

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Barriers to Physical Activity in Individuals with ID - $10 - Dr. James Rimmer, Director of the Lakeshore Foundation/University of Alabama at Birmingham Research Collaborative, speaks on the different barriers and improvements in physical activity in individuals with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD). He has been developing and overseeing physical activity programs for people with disabilities for over thirty years. Many studies have found that being overweight is highly prevalent in adults with IDD. He explores factors that play a role in reduced physical activity and discuss lifestyle choices and organizational change to improve the health of people with IDD.

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Wellness for Every Body: Training for Staff Who Support Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - $10 - Obesity is a public health epidemic, and the crisis is worse for people with disabilities. Adults with disabilities are 58 percent more likely to be obese than adults without disabilities, and children and adolescents with disabilities are 38 percent more likely to be obese than children without disabilities. To address this problem Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department developed Wellness for Every Body (WFEB), an online training program for direct service providers. WFEB uses an environmental approach that targets adult care homes for intervention and creates conditions that establish healthy living as the norm. The training is available 24/7 to teach the basics of nutrition, cooking, and physical activity so direct service providers can support active living and healthy practices in group homes and organizations serving people with I/DD. Due to its environmental approach, WFEB is applicable to other service provider settings, such as behavioral health, traumatic brain injury, and the elderly and people with physical disabilities. In 2013, Wellness for Every Body was recognized as a Promising Practice by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Model and Promising Practices Program. Join NACCHO's Sarah Yates and Hennepin County Public Health Department's Carolyn Novak and Dianne Blaydes to learn about this program and how you can use it in your jurisdiction.

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Health Fundango: Missoula Montana’s BMI Screenings for Children and Adolescents in Special Education - Obesity is a public health epidemic, and the crisis is worse for children and adolescents with disabilities, who are 38% more likely to be obese than their peers without disabilities. The Health Fundango Program, conducted by the local health department in Missoula County, MT, was developed to assess the BMI of students throughout the county. With assistance from the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), Missoula expanded the program to include assessment, evaluation, and interventions related to the BMI of students in special education. Attendees will learn how the county implemented this program, what roadblocks they encountered, and will see results from the large pool of data collected over the 3 years of this project.

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ORAL HEALTH:

Oral Health, Disease, and Prevention - $10 - Dennis McTigue DDS, MS, a professor of Pediatric Dentistry at Ohio State University’s College of Dentistry, speaks about the causes of dental diseases and the preventative methods/techniques to take that will help to reduce this epidemic.  Poor oral hygiene is prevalent in a vast amount of individuals with I/DD due to various factors; however dental decay and disease can be avoided with the knowledge of good oral hygiene practices. Dennis focuses on the more common oral health issues facing people with disabilities and routine tricks about how to motivate individuals to maintain good oral health. Dennis also provides resources and supports for ways to seek out necessary treatments in your community.

Caregivers Role in Maintaining Good Oral Health for Individuals with IDD - The challenge for optimal oral health in the special needs population rests in the hands of the caregiver, not with the patient. Studies show that the most significant factor is the caregivers’ ability to take care of their own oral health. This poses the problem of not only assessing oral health status of the patient, but also that of the caregiver. Once understood, modifications in daily oral hygiene routines and accommodations for oral care can implemented. Join Dr. Lisa Buda from the Blende Dental Group to learn more about these best practices.

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TOBACCO:

Tobacco Cessation for Individuals with Disabilities - Smoking is bad for your health. It’s a fact we have all known for a long time now, so why are so many of us still doing it? In this webinar, Candice Lee from the Michigan Dept. of Community Health reveals the prevalence and patterns of tobacco use in individuals with I/DD. She also shows the impact that tobacco use can have on your health, finances and other implications it can lead to. Tobacco cessation resources for individuals with I/DD and ways to effectively communicate the important message for the need to quit smoking are also given.

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WOMEN’S HEALTH:

Women’s Health Issues Over a Lifespan - $10 - Dr. Suzanne Smeltzer RN, EdD, FAAN, a Professor and Director for the Center for Nursing Research at Villanova University’s College of Nursing, speaks about the health issues affecting women with disabilities throughout their lifespan. She touches on the more common age-related issues, such as osteoporosis, which is highly prevalent in woman with disabilities due to factors such as by immobility, use of antiepileptics, lower bone mineral density and bone loss. She also discusses the regular health screenings that all woman need to maintain throughout their lives and the importance behind these necessary screenings, including breast health/check-ups, pap smears and gynecology visits.

Women Be Healthy: A Promising Intervention to Promote Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening for Women with ID - In this webinar Susan Parish, Director of the Lurie Institute for Disability Policy at The Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, reviews the Women Be Healthy project and results from the projects various tests. Women Be Healthy offers classes and resources for women and professionals to help them learn to express their health concerns and be more prepared and informed when visiting the physician.Susan discusses the prevalence of cervical and breast cancer screening in women with ID and why it is so important. Barriers to this type of care are also given along with information regarding the significant racial disparities in mammography for women with ID.

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